betta polls 

sharing our experiences together, 
so we can become better betta hobbysts 

                     

 u current betta poll: please participate!

Each one of us hold a little piece of the great puzzle bettas are. Together, by pulling our resources, we can find out more about these incredibly fascinating creatures and solve some of their mysteries. So go ahead! Share your little piece of puzzle with us and together, we will all learn.

 

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 u archived betta polls: latest poll at top!!

The following are former polls I took on the BETTATALK website. These statistics might be helpful in learning more about bettas. Enjoy them and may they be of assistance to you.
 

 

BETTA POLL    # 4

Does handling freeze dried bloodworm make you sneeze, or give you any kind of allergic reaction? (itchy eyes, runny nose, congestion, etc...) [610 votes total]

    ............................................

I use F.D bloodworms and have no allergic reaction to it.  (387 votes) 62%


I do not use F.D bloodworms  (178 votes) 29%

I currently use or have used F.D bloodworms and I am allergic to it (45 votes) 7%
 

 

WHAT WE HAVE LEARNED:

Although quite a few breeders I know (including myself) actually are allergic to F.D bloodworms, it seems that the big picture is still pretty good, with 62% of users not having any allergic reaction to this type of food when manipulating it. My advice, is if you are going to feed your bettas F.D bloodworms, try to buy only a very small quantity of it to start with, especially if you are prone to allergies. Try it, and if you do not sneeze your sinuses out :), then go for it! 

Tips: If you are mildly allergic to it but want to continue feeding it to your fish, then try this: wear a mask, it helps. You can find masks at hardware stores, they are made of paper like material with a rubber ban holding them in place. They are light and inexpensive and WILL cut down the sneezing. Also, immediately wash your hands as soon as you are done feeding. Don't rub your eyes!!

Another good tip: leave your canister of food open in your humid fishroom. After a few weeks, it will soak up some of that moisture and become less brittle and produce less fine powder residue when you touch it so you will also inhale it less and will have less of a reaction to it. 

 

 

BETTA POLL    # 3

What do you feed your bettas? 

     .............................................. 



live worms:
5%
live brine shrimp:
6%
other live foods:
2%
frozen foods:
8%
freeze dried bloodworms:
17%
freeze dried brine shrimp:
6%
betta bites:
13%
betta bio gold:
11%
bettamin:
6%
pellets:
6%
flakes:
9%
other:
4%
 

 

WHAT WE HAVE LEARNED:

Despite what one might think, live worms are not the most popular betta food amongst betta keepers. Neither are frozen foods. This poll revealed that most people feed freeze dried blood worms to their bettas, followed by betta bites (that was a surprise), and betta bio gold. 

Live brine shrimp appear to also be slightly more popular than live worms, which also came as a surprise to me.

Most of the people who took the poll are regular betta owners, as opposed to seasoned betta breeders, and I am sure we would get a different result would we poll the IBC betta breeders instead. I have a feeling we would find that live foods and frozen and freeze dried would be mostly used, and very little of the manufactured and otherwise very expensive foods such as bio gold etc would be picked. But that is yet another poll for me to do :).

 

BETTA POLL    # 2

Do more of your bettas come down with dropsy when you feed them live brown worms?

............................................


Yes!:
11%
no, not at all:
9%
I think so, but I am not sure:
5%
I do not feed live worms, so I don't know:
74%
 

 

 

WHAT WE HAVE LEARNED:

This poll took a while to unfold with over 400 votes and when all was said and done it appears as though live worms do in deed promote the occurrence of dropsy (a swelling of the abdomen resulting in death in 99% of cases).

When looking at the nutritional content of live worms, one can understand why they would promote bloating. They are mostly protein and have almost no fiber at all. Hence bettas might be unable to fully move them through the intestinal tract. Furthermore, the worms are infested with bacteria and parasites, all of which can attack the betta and cause dropsy. For all above reasons I personally have elected to give up feeding live worms altogether.

 

BETTA POLL    # 1

How long did it take for your last pair to spawn (once female was released)?

   ..................................................



same day:
21%
next day:
41%
3 days:
17%
4 days:
5%
5 days:
1%
6 days:
1%
a week:
1%
more than 1 week:
8%
 

 

WHAT WE HAVE LEARNED:

 

This poll clearly indicates that most pairs will spawn in the first 48 hours, with a preference for waiting for a day to get "to know each other" some. The male is probably busy building his nest and the female will not join him until she deems the nest worthy of her :).

The occurrence of spawning decreases thereafter rapidly with almost no chances of getting a spawn going past the 4th day, hence it might be best to then remove the pair.

However, in some cases, sticking it out might be rewarding with an 8% chance of the reluctant pair spawning after a week spent together. This is however quite stressful for the breeders and in most cases not recommended.

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